Gaming of Weighted Lead Time

Nick:

I think this highlights important points about metrics. I favour fewer of course, however this one looks like it’s very useful.

Originally posted on The IT Risk Manager:

This post is in response to Kent McDonald’s excellent question on the Weighted Lead Time post. The question deserves a longer response. Kent asked… “What are some of the behavior changes you have seen from teams or organizations when they started paying attention to this metric?”

I spent over two years at Skype working on metrics at the organisational level, especially operational metrics. I learnt two key lessons:

  1. All metrics will be gamed. In fact Robert Benefield, an expert in game theory, gave the following advice. “All metrics will be gamed, when you design a metric, start with the behaviour you want and then create the metric so that when it is gamed, you get the behaviour that you want”. A variant of lead time is a great example. The easiest way to game lead time variants is to create smaller units of work which is exactly the behaviour we…

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Edits to my Personal Manifesto

I documented my personal manifesto originally in this link.  It was useful to get it down on paper rather than a tacit understanding.  I think I should sharpen it up a bit.  It’s the same mostly – some wording has been modified.  I’m asking people to call me out when I err.

G(enuine) – Be honest, forthright and fair rather than vague, fake and invulnerable

R(espect) – Actively listen and respect (not necessarily agree with) the views of others rather than jump to hasty conclusions

I(ntegrity) – Uphold good human values and principles and avoid situations that are opposite to these

T(ransparency) – Be open about why, what and how rather than obfuscate, obscure or opaque

S(incere) –  Mean what we say via actions rather than being glib, hollow and lack of follow through.

Whilst we try and be all things on the left we sometimes recognize we fall into the poor behaviours on the right and seek to correct that.


Photos Augusta Georgia and Columbia South Carolina

Just a few photos I posted on Google+ from a trip for work to Columbia South Carolina. I passed through Augusta Georgia the home town of a musical hero, the late James Brown.

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Ok to be Mediocre, Ok to want to Improve

Last week I posted the following to twitter, somewhat inspired by Margaret Heffernan’s TED Talk on the Pecking Order and also by my own experiences in being interviewed and interviewing applicants for jobs (some ideas captured here in a earlier post/rant on broader dysfunctions).

Elitistism preventing New Hires

Some questions in interviews are valid but when it takes a demeaning, condescending tone – that’s when you know you’re in trouble.

Friend and colleague, Ryan Musgrave, in response, posted this video from Jacob Kaplan-Mosson (a self confessed mediorce programmer), which is related to the subject.  Those 10x programmers that some dream of hiring just aren’t as thick on the ground.  In fact hiring them could also reduce the through put of your team (read Five Dysfunctions of a Team to get a real life account of this).

We mostly fall in the middle for talent

We mostly fall in the middle for talent

We mostly fall in the middle of a normal distribution as the video explains.  It’s time to stop dreaming of hiring superstars and look to develop the skills of high potential applicants.  They needn’t know the Agile Principles off by heart or recite every little bit of Object Oriented doctrine that could easily be memorized anyway.

Look to test applicants on more meaningful questions about how they deal with technical problems, how they learn, how they deal with people problems.  Again these need not be perfect answers but should give you a feeling of potentiality.  Ultimately a good applicant wants to develop mastery in what they do.  Think of questions that will give you clues to this and give you a feeling of genuineness.

Ultimately Values, Principles and Philosophy should align best they can.  If your own Vision is strong then finding those who want to follow should not be hard.  As those looking to hire, perhaps starting there and looking inwards is the place to start.

Those feeling belittled by by the superstar programmer, take solace, also look inward and look to get the best out of yourself.  If your a superstar programmer and maybe not as generous to others in the team, you can improve as well by helping others to improve technically.  Collaboration is hard but does reap many benefits personally and for others and for the bottom line.


Sultry Sunday Summer Sunrise in Chattanooga

The coolest part of the day in humid Chattanooga.  28 degrees Celsius can easily feel like 38 degrees Celsius during the day.  Sunday morning is the quietest and stillest part of the week and more apt to capturing the city still asleep.

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Ask Why – To Understand

This is a follow on post from my post called Ask How (Don’t say No). Sometimes in some situations it makes more sense to Ask Why to increase understanding.

Sometimes we find ourselves in a passionate conversation about a topic.  Someone says something, perhaps in a strident tone, this can force a reaction from others that implies that what has been said is wrong.  The response can stop conversation dead in it’s tracks as processing of the remarks take place.

Now a facilitator can help keep the conversation going and relieve the tension and let the point carry on to it’s final conclusion.  We don’t have a facilitator all the time though, so we can train ourselves to react quickly still but thoughtfully as well.

I suggest the first response is ‘Why?’, ‘Why do you say that?’  This could help create a response that helps the person retrieve an important item that adds further context.  Sometimes excitement causes that person to forget to mention that important piece of context.  Asking Why is an Open Question and keeps the conversation going rather than perhaps escalating into an out and out disagreement.


People in Boston – American Independence Day 2015

A trip to the Ball Game at Fenway Park and some interesting characters on the streets of downtown Boston.

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