Tag Archives: Testing

Keeping up Technical Chops

Got asked to do this for a Coaching job.  It was nice to do.

There is an important and underestimated place for technical excellence.  Heck, it’s a principle!  Combine it with the others 🙂  Standing on the shoulders, Thanks Beck, Rainsberger, Meszaros,  Fowler, Wake, Prag Programmers and  many more unnamed.  It has 36 commits to demonstrate the process.  Feel free to take a look at it.  #agile #tdd #quality #emergent

https://github.com/nzdojo/spellchecker

Read the notes:

https://github.com/nzdojo/spellchecker/wiki/Notes-on-Implementation

‘Keep hands on, that includes the code!’

 


ICAgile Agile Testing Expert Gate

In this recording of a webinar I participated in on January 28th 2015, Janet Gregory who is one of the track authors and has written the immensely popular Agile Testing with Lisa Crispin and now More Agile Testing again with Lisa Crispin, tells us about the criteria for achieving Expert Status in Agile Testing.

It’s quite a jump from taking a course and we learn that demonstrated experience over a number of years is key.  No exams here we emphatically say.

We also talk about the new book, More Agile Testing, and I pose some questions as well.  Janet and Lisa bring up Organisational culture early in the book and I commend them for this rather than assuming that it takes place.  I also liked the balanced reporting of views of the testing quadrants.  It’s mental model that has been in some quarters taken down in an unkind manner.  They report on the better variations and tell us not to take a ‘cookie cutter’ approach to its application.

We also had other panelists involved bringing in their expert views.  Thanks to Aldo Rall, Devin Hedge and Agile Bill Krebs.  Elinor Slomba once again handled the facilitation brilliantly over a difficult medium at times.


A Cloud9 Custom Runner combining TypeScript and Mocha

The online IDE Cloud 9 is just awesome.  It is amongst a number of online IDEs out there, of which I think it is the best.  With Microsoft also making .NET opensource and available on all platforms I can also see myself doing .NET development on this as well.  Yes I know there is Monaco from Microsoft but that is still immature and yes there is Mono on linux as well but that requires fiddling about.

At the moment I’m doing node.js development with expressjs and now with typescript in the mix as well.  Typescript looks awesome as well.  I’ve ported some javascript code over to Typescript and it feels really nice.

However, Cloud9 does not have a runner setup for typescript compilation so I decided to set one up myself.  Cloud 9 provides a way to do this by adding a New Runner from the Run Menu.  I created the following script that associates the .ts file extension with the tsc compiler.  It will also then run the associated mocha test which existed when the code was just pure javascript.  It does rely on a naming convention and directory location for the test, so as long as you stick to a convention you will be Ok.  Here is the script:

{
“cmd” : [“bash”, “–login”, “-c”, “rm $file_base_name’.js’;tsc –sourcemap –module commonjs $file; mocha test/$file_base_name’Tests.js'”],
“info” : “Compiling Typescript file $file”,
“env” : {},
“selector” : “source.ts”
}

It uses bash to run multiple commands, one for the Tyepscript compiler and then followed by the mocha test runner.  Prior to running these command it deletes the previous .js file and if tsc fails the old file is still there and the test runner will pick that up still and we rather not have that.

I found when I converted the javascript implementation of the main file to typescript and compiled, my tests just worked.  The tests are still in pure javascript.  I’m still entertaining the idea of using Steve Fenton’s tsUnit but I fear it may not be as mature as the javascript test ecosystem.


Real Business Value of Testers

Another reminder type blog post that may or may not get further expanded upon 🙂

Liz Keogh says:

“If you don’t have actual testers, get someone to play that role. Someone who *isn’t* a dev. Us devs are very good at abstraction, and will start solving a problem before we see the whole problem. I don’t believe that an awesome dev can also be an awesome tester, or vice-versa.”

I wonder if we still need tools.  James Shore says the tools are a waste in 2010.  Was in kind of agreement there with him.  But there is value in the thinking process and dev’s can’t do all of this.   I need to revisit Jame’s article from then to make sure I’ve got all the nuance and not glossed over details.

Tools help but that’s not the be all and end all.  Remember the Agile Manifesto.

I tend to think the Agile Tester (more so than the traditional tester) can be a great productivity booster and very valuable to the organisation.  Their critical thinking at the beginning should be regarded as a blessing.  I’ve also worked with some great testers at end of the cycle, but you can also feel their frustration as well.  We can help each other 🙂

This is a reminder only – ideas are still forming – but the conversation is nonetheless open.